• I have been holding off on this until I gathered more data. I wish my Core numbers were as good as yours. I try to stick with data and avoid emotion, so here is my attempt.

    ENVIRONMENT: I fly at the Willy McCool Park in North Las Vegas Nevada, please google map it and note our proximity to a very large housing subdivision. There is also a large cell tower located approximately 1.5 miles from our field. Nellis Air Force Base, home of Red Flag, the Weapons School and the Thunderbirds, is 10 miles away. The Nellis air combat ranges are to the North of us on the other side of 8000 ft mountains.

    PERSONAL FLYING HISTORY: I have flown RC at this field since 2005 and NEVER had an RF issue using a JR 12X on both DSM2 and DSMX. I fly jets and Warbirds (BVM F-4 and CARF Corsair for example). I have flown RC since I learned to fly in Germany in 1977. I started flying with the Core last year in October.

    THE TEST: Two aircraft, a Yellow Aircraft P-47 with a gas motor and a Black Horse Westland Wyvern on electric. Both aircraft have a PBR9 and PBR26 feeding into a Power Expander on the P-47 and a Mercury on the Wyvern. What follows are the averages for 19 flights between these aircraft:

    19 Flights TotalLowHighAverage
    Mercury/Expander Lost Frames631076258
    PBR9 Min LQ1%66528
    PBR9 Min LQ2% (13 of the sample [P-47] have this antenna outside the fuselage)55421
    PBR26 Min LQ1% (6 of the sample [Wyvern] have both antennas outside the fuselage in a wing tip)56641
    PBR26 Min LQ2%34559
    Mercury/Expander Antenna 1 Fades3141450810
    Mercury/Expander Antenna 2 Fades3191018648
    PBR9 Frame Losses3971152355
    PBR26 Frame Losses245879342
    Mercury/Expander Holds
    000

    DATA INTERPRETATION: Always flying with 4 receivers at my field is a good plan. The Power Box lost frame average of 258 and 0 holds demonstrates this to me. In this small sample size I see no value in routing the receiver antennas outside the fuselage (one fiberglass, one wood, no carbon fiber). Even the small sample size of 19 confirms what we already know at my field. There are two "hot spots" at either end of the flying area near the houses and in the line-of-sight to the cell tower where Jeti, Futaba MZ18WC and yes...Core, experience serious degraded RF performance. My two jet flyer friends on Jeti use 900 MHz backup and their radios will switch to 900 MHz for a short period of time (less than 5 seconds) when they fly in the "hot spots" on a bad RF day. My Core LQ warnings (set at 10% red and 20% yellow) will also go off if I fly in the same area. I know, 10% and 20%!!! Yes, look at my low and high LQ values. Yes, I account for transmitter proximity to the receivers during preflight

    SUMMATION: I do have confidence in the Core, but only with 4 receivers when flying at my field. For me, it is mandatory to have 4 paths for the signal to get through so up to 3 of them can be severely degraded leaving 1 to hold the line for the second or so it takes for one of the other receivers to pick up the load. I have thought about why my Spektrum-based JR12X has never had any issues and I think it is a combination of 1. Always using 4 receivers, so I'm probably not aware its having RF issues, and 2. The older radios like the 12X are pushing 128 milliwatts, I do not have the brain power to know if this is a reasonable assumption.


    I have offered this for your information only. Perhaps to steady anyone who is maybe having thoughts about how reliable the Core RF link is. I trust it, and it is going in my new CARF Corsair/Moki combination.


    Respectfully submitted,


    Greg

  • Yes, thanks Greg. Looks like I don't need to be concerned about low LQI's and instead I should look for holds.

    I'll repeat my flights this coming weekend over the same spot that gave low LQI's, and this time I'll look for any holds.

    I think the Core will do well.

  • I would not ignore the receiver LQ values Bob. I use my low LQ alarms as a barometer on how bad the RF environment is on that day and as an indicator to avoid the areas triggering the alarm as much as possible. Between my Core alarms and my friend's Jeti alarms we have a good feel for when it is a busy RF day and perhaps not prudent to risk an expensive jet or warbird.

  • I would not ignore the receiver LQ values Bob. I use my low LQ alarms as a barometer on how bad the RF environment is on that day and as an indicator to avoid the areas triggering the alarm as much as possible. Between my Core alarms and my friend's Jeti alarms we have a good feel for when it is a busy RF day and perhaps not prudent to risk an expensive jet or warbird.

    My plan is to lower the Rx LQ alarms to 20%. I had version 1.65 in my Core so was not able to check for holds. Now I can with 1.95. Thank you for your input.

  • SUMMATION: I do have confidence in the Core, but only with 4 receivers when flying at my field. For me, it is mandatory to have 4 paths for the signal to get through so up to 3 of them can be severely degraded leaving 1 to hold the line for the second or so it takes for one of the other receivers to pick up the load

    Greg

    May I inquire about the setup to be able to use 4 receivers? I know the Tx can bind to them, but do you use "Royal" like central where the servos connect?

    I'm familiar with the XPS24 that can connect to 4 receivers, but wondering if there is another solution out there.

    Thanks

    Edgar

  • Richard and Greg, I could not view log files on the Core, however I.was able to download log files, such as this one, from the Core to a USB stick and then view in the PB Terminal on my PC. It has a list for different data choices, but I don't see Holds. How do I see if I had any holds?


  • Janr, I'm referring to Richard's post #17.


    Edgar, I'm looking for the number of Holds, if any, during a flight.


    Growler84 listed Hold counts as 0 in the data he shared. I'm looking for the same thing (and also hopefully 0's) and would like to know where the Hold data is located.


    I hope I don't need a Mercury or other power regulator to see Hold data. I have a Mercury for one of my turbine jets, but my small foam test plane doesn't have room for a Mercury. It has a PBR-9D that is only using 4 channels.


    Richard, can I view the number of Holds in a flight either on the Core or in the data downloaded to the PB Terminal? If so, how do I find it?


    Thank you all for your help and suggestions.

  • Did a couple more flights today in the 'hot spot' with the foam Mentor test plane. My Mercury is in a turbine jet and I didn't want to disconnect everything to remove it and then try to squeeze it into the Mentor, so I have no Hold or Fade data.


    The lowest PBR-9D LQI was 18%. The lowest Core LQI was 47%. There were 83 lost frames on one flight. I never lost control on any of the 6 total flights. So until there's a way to check for holds without the Mercury it seems the Core is safe to fly in this 'hot spot'.


    Next test will be at another flying field that recently had a weather tower installed nearby and it shoots down planes with Spektrum radios. I'll report back after I do a few flights through that hot spot.

  • Bob: As Richard mentioned, HOLDS are only accessible via a PowerBox like the Mercury or Power Expander. The RF in your flying environment looks similar to mine based on the numbers you reported. I highly recommend you utilize at least a Power Expander so you can plug two receiver boxes in like I do. This will give you the "4 receivers" I mentioned in my original post.


    Edgar: Some expansion on what I wrote above, the PBR9 and PBR26 each contain 2 receivers. So using two of these receiver boxes, if you will, results in 4 reception paths. This is what I mean when I say I use 4 receivers.


    Greg

  • Thank you Greg. I have a Mercury, but I'm not willing to disconnect it from my jet to mount in the little foam test plane. Of course my turbine jets with DX18 have 4 receivers and my P-51 with a Jeti DS24 has two 2.4 receivers plus one 900MHz receiver. I don't fly these planes in the hot spots and the DX18 never had a single hold in 5 years and the DS24 never went to 900 in 2 years.


    From my career developing electronic hardware for the aerospace industry I get very specific how I mount receiver antennas in turbine jets. I rarely have an antenna sticking out of the fuselage, but I stay away from CF, wiring and fuel lines and I have all the antennas on a different axis and spaced out along the length of the fuselage. So far, knock on wood, I haven't had a signal loss.


    Before I put my Core in one of my new jets I just want to test it in known bad RF areas 'hot spots'. So far everything looks good. Even though I currently can't check for holds in the Core it never went to failsafe with only 2 receivers (1 PBR9) so I probably didn't get any holds anyway. If I use the Core in a jet I will use 2 PBR26 (4 receivers) in a Powerbox. Thank you again for sending your data.

  • Did another Core test yesterday at another field where towers have been installed and RC planes have crashed. I flew the Core through the hot spot multiple times and it performed perfectly with only a few lost frames and Q drops for Tx's and Rx's. Core is Great!


    When I got home I went to open the PB Terminal to download my USB adapter data from the Core. The PB Terminal had an update. I updated to 3.1.3 but now it says 'No USB Adapter'. My OS is Windows 7 Ultimate.


    Another question: What steps are needed so I can control the main volume using the left knob?


    Thanks,
    Bob